Home > Academic OB/GYN Podcast, Green Journal, Grey Journal, Journal Articles > Academic OB/GYN Podcast Episode 25 – Journals for August and September 2010

Academic OB/GYN Podcast Episode 25 – Journals for August and September 2010

In this episode special guest Dr Paul Browne joins me to discuss current literature from the August and September issues of the Green and Grey Journals!  Topics include generational gaps, contraceptive efficacy in obesity, and abuse of the least publishable unit.

Academic OB/GYN Podcast Episode 25 – Journals for August and September 2010

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  1. CountryMidwife
    September 15, 2010 at 12:09 pm

    Hi Doctor Fogelson. A request here for a new post. Are you interested in examining the issue of flu shots for pregnant women? The info below is being passed around the “natural child birth advocate” circles and I admit I have a hard time figuring out what to recommend and the quality of the evidence behind recommendations. Of course public health is about the good of the many over the few, but I care so much about the few, too… Thanks if you bite!

    http://preventdisease.com/news/10/091410_H1N1_miscarriages_shocking_report.shtml

  2. September 15, 2010 at 12:26 pm

    Thanks for the note. A lot of people got the H1N1 vaccine in pregnancy, and not surprisingly some of those women had miscarriages. The data presented on this website lacks any control group to show that the vaccine is in any way associated with these miscarriages. They are making completely baseless claims. I actually addressed this issue in a podcast a while back I think ( or maybe it was HPV vaccine I can’t remember)

    I don’t really have a great deal of interest in try to tear down the views of vaccine conspiracy theorists. They don’t really respond to scientific argument, in my experience.

    What I can tell you is that in my hospital 2 women died last year from H1N1 pneumonia in pregnancy. I wish they had been vaccinated.

    Nick Fogelson

  3. CountryMidwife
    September 16, 2010 at 12:23 pm

    Thanks. After I posed this I thought, oh dear, that would make for QUITE the thread and that’s a lot to take on! I was vaccinated for H1N1 last year, based on my research, too, not for me but for the welfare of my clients. But one more question… how can you get the regular flu shot this year without being “double dosed” on H1N1 if you got it last year?

  4. Laura
    September 20, 2010 at 4:26 pm

    Hey Dr. Fogelson,

    I had a question that was a little off topic and was wondering if you could help me.

    I was interested in learning more about primary neuroproliferative vestibulodynia and the vestibulectomy surgical procedure and didn’t notice any information regarding these topics on your blog. Just out of curiosity, have you performed any vestibulectomies? If so, how many have you performed in your career?

    Thanks for your help!

    • October 3, 2010 at 11:07 am

      I did a number of vestibulectomies in residency, under Dr David Soper who is a big believer in this technique for vestibulitis. I haven’t done many since residency, if only because I haven’t had many patient with this issue in my practice.

      As Dr Gunter and I talked about in Episode 24, not all experts in this area believe as strongly in this technique. You might like to listen to her comments on this topic in that episode.

  5. October 25, 2010 at 1:12 am

    BV and other opportunists.

    There is clear evidence of neurologic injury to uterus, cervix, vagina and vulva through difficult intrapartum episodes and prolonged physical efforts during defecation. Does this make women more susceptible to opportunist infections ? Preliminary evidence (Straub, 2009) suggests that denervation changes the infection portfolio dramatically from pathogens to opportunists. If you have a fixed injury promoting infection then only recourse is recurrent treatment.

    May I declare no vestibulectomies in 25 years since most vulval pain arises from aberrant reinnervation following a difficult second stage, or, if pain is largely premenstrual – physical efforts during defecation. Latter responds to GNRH agonists interestingly.

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